Singham Returns review: Ajay Devgn kicks butt, but the film lacks punch!

Rating: 2/5

Thanks to Ajay’s earnest effort, a very predictable Singham Returns becomes entertaining, but only in parts.

Explaining the plot of Singham Returns is easier than making morning tea. So here’s how it goes. As we all know by now, Bajirao Singham (Ajay Devgn) has moved to a bigger city – aamchi Mumbai. The film begins with a traffic hawaldar (police) who is harassed by a group of mischievous young college students and needs to be rescued. Enter Bajirao Singham (in his inimitable style wearing aviators) who advice them to channelise their energies in the right direction (only to ensure the audience that they take Singham’s advice seriously and emerge post interval to help Singham) instead of putting them behind bars. Seeing that Singham’s constable tells the young fellows – ‘Saahab ne shahar badla hai, swabhaav nahi’, giving more emphasis on the fact that Singham has returned and how! Cut to the title song that starts in the background.

Bajirao and Avni (Kareena Kapoor) continue to be totally in love and sing love songs on the streets but Bajirao insists he’s not dating Avni! Enter a mean looking villain – Swamiji (Amol Gupte) – a dharma guru, who fools people in the name of religion and runs black money racket. Swamiji considers an honest political leader Guruji (Anupam Kher) a threat who wants to bring a new change in the society. As a result, Swamiji threatens Guruji and warns him to back out from elections. And when Guruji refuses to do so, Swamiji gets him killed.

Now Singham is in quest of facts which state that Swamiji is a murderer but doing so, he finds himself into a trap as a police constable from his team is found dead in an ambulance full of money. Singham is charged of being corrupt but he fights back to prove that he’s innocent. He takes it upon himself to clear the name of his colleague. Singham works disguisely with his police squad comprising Daya (television actor and CID fame Dayanand Shetty) to gather enough saboot (evidence) and eventually gets hold of Swamiji’s most trusted man and when Singham is about to surrender the culprit in court, Swamiji’s men conspire, set the city on fire and kill the culprit.

Considering the damage to the city, Maharashtra’s Chief Minister (Mahesh Manjrekar) set up an enquiry committee on Singham and his squad. Aur baaki jaisa Hindi filmo mein hota hai, Singham and his team let go off his khakee wardee and his disciplinary values and enter Swamiji’s sprawling villa to beat him and his group. Here, Rohit Shetty gives the message loud and clear – don’t test the patience of cops. Cut to the climax – a good action sequence where Swamiji and his associate – a corrupt politician and Guruji’s rival (Zakir Hussain) confess their crime after Singham to shoot them and the villains are defeated. The End.

As is obvious by now, Singham Returns is too predictable. Post interval, you constantly wait for something to happen, something to surprise you, but when a development does come, it’s too late and too lame. Since the script is weak, Rohit relies on action sequences and dumdaar dialogues to do the trick. But that gets too repetitive by the end of it with the use of the iconic – “Aata majhi satakli”.

Kareena has nothing much to do in this sequel but she is always a delight to watch. She appears and disappears at will and makes no impression. Amol Gupte gets a chance to show off his acting skills and he proves that he is still a formidable actor. After Prakash Raj (who played Jaykant Shikre in Singham) the sequel definitely needed a more menacing villain to make Singham look stronger.

Now for the few good things: Most of us will watch Singham Returns only for Ajay and yes he keeps up the good work and continues to roar with his performance. But he doesn’t get enough support from his filmmaker friend Rohit (also the story writer), who fails to recreate the magic of Singham which was a potboiler with a pacey storyline and loads of punches. In the sequel, everything is way too hunky dory and Singham is just having a field day.

Some action scenes are well choreographed and this time it’s mostly real. The few entertaining portions come in the form of Singham’s dumdaar dialogues with his enemies and his interactions with Swamiji.

Overall, Singham Returns released on Independence Day might bring in the moolah, but may not succeed in winning the audiences’ heart the way Singham did. So watch it for Ajay if you must, but be ready to be disappointed. I suggest you settle into your couch and catch the first part once again on television instead!

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